Ruin and reproduction

“War destroys and wipes out any kind of individuality.
Savchenko’s paintings are about the city’s recognizable landscape that is transformed into a monotony of ruins that has no personality anymore. This is symbolic and inherent in today’s world: demolishing and equalizing personality as such.
From a conversation with the artist Olena Turyanska
Ruin is a term with several meanings.
Every government or country writes a story in its own way, so the story should not be understood but felt.
A series of works that is based on original photographs of destroyed cities after World War II: Dresden, Coventry, Warsaw, Kiev, Hiroshima and Gdansk. 6 works, 6 cities, 6 stories, 6 ruins.
Destroyed cities created with oil and water-based paints, so conflicts between these two opposing substances cannot be avoided. The endless conflict of oil and water in the physical world should perhaps be the main key to reading this series. A conflict that sooner or later is doomed to historical fixation and reconciliation. Probably, the photos were taken from a high-flying airplane; it is always at altitude that the horizon line relative to the landscape is the same.
All the works are diptychs, and there is the impression as if the eerie landscape is contemplated from the window of a tall, mythical building. An emotional, sensitive look at the dramatically set design of history by viewing the annihilated centers of civilization. A picture of the world that makes it possible to bring up to date the vision of a story that needs to be felt, not just understood.

Serhiy Savchenko, resistance against death. Olena Grubb, MAAB Sotheby’s Institute of Art